Recent articles

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"Scott Holmquist's chronic freedom series: cannabis growing for the future alien peasant," Humboldt Cannabis Magazine, spring 2018

..."when I viewed these volumes... it felt a bit as though a social revolutionary with the Situationist International had traveled forward in time, juking improbably from Paris 1968 to Garberville 2010, producing a radical archive in codex form along the way."

 

 
Trevor Paglen, INTRUDER 12A in Vulpecula (Ocean Reconnaissance Satellite; USA 274), 2017; dye sublimation print, white semi-matte. 60 x 48 in.

Trevor Paglen, INTRUDER 12A in Vulpecula (Ocean Reconnaissance Satellite; USA 274), 2017; dye sublimation print, white semi-matte. 60 x 48 in.

"Trevor Paglen: Impossible Objects at Altman Siegel," Art Practical, May 8, 2018

"When Orbital Reflector speeds across the sky, observers will see a point drawing a bright line that continually erases itself, mimicking the progress of a small comet."

Cynthia Hooper,  Cultivated Ecologies , video still, 2018

Cynthia Hooper, Cultivated Ecologies, video still, 2018

"Bit Torrent: the work of Cynthia Hooper," Art Practical, February 27, 2018

"Cynthia Hooper's current show, Cultivated Ecologies at Humboldt State University Third Street Gallery, is part art, part educational initiative, and part environmental broadsheet. Hooper uses videos, maps, and graphics to chart the epically scaled works of 20th-century engineering that reconfigured California’s waterways, upending the state’s ecological balance in the process."

Becky Evans, Turf Spiral (detail), 2016

Becky Evans, Turf Spiral (detail), 2016

“Showcasing the Unseen: Becky Evans’s Waterlines,” San Francisco Art Quarterly, October 16, 2016

“This is “nature” stretched thin to the point of transparency: a monoculture product, grass selected across generations for toughness and uniformity, spooled on a reel for convenience.”

 
Shahpour Pouyan, untitled works from the  Projectiles  series, steel, iron, and ink, 2013-16

Shahpour Pouyan, untitled works from the Projectiles series, steel, iron, and ink, 2013-16

“Homeland Security at the Presidio,” San Francisco Art Quarterly, December 15, 2016

“The sculptures hang suspended from the chapel ceiling. At close range, it becomes possible to see that their steel surfaces are covered with intricate embossed designs. Passages of Arabic calligraphy alternate with intricate patterning that figures nature with images of twisting foliage and vines—images of organic plenitude that are somehow genuinely shocking to encounter in this context.”

 

 
Leigh-Ann Pahapill,  Likewise, as technical experts, but not (at all) by way of culture , video installation, 2012-2013.

Leigh-Ann Pahapill, Likewise, as technical experts, but not (at all) by way of culture, video installation, 2012-2013.

“Skin Deep: Surfacing with Leigh-Ann Pahapill,” Contemporaneity 4: Historical Presence in Visual Culture, 2015

“Like the adjacent sculptures, the videos proposed a model of existence as depthless surface. Plastic sheeting has no interior and no exterior, no front and no back. The marks an artist makes upon its surface are reversible. Likewise, a stage prop is valued for its surface appearance. Its interiority—or lack thereof—is unimportant. Façade is key.”

 

 
Nam June Paik, still from  Guadalcanal Requiem  featuring Paik and Charlotte Moorman, 1977

Nam June Paik, still from Guadalcanal Requiem featuring Paik and Charlotte Moorman, 1977

“Reversing Time’s Arrow in Nam June Paik’s Guadalcanal Requiem,” Quarterly Review of Film and Video, 30: 219-231, 2013  

“The focus of my inquiries is a passage at the center of the video that incorporates a reversed video clip, creating the impression of reversed time. This clip is incorporated into a narrative sequence in which the reversal of time is presented as a fantasy solution that undoes the devastation of war.”

 

 
Bruce Nauman, still from  Lip Sync,  1969

Bruce Nauman, still from Lip Sync, 1969

 

 
Harriet Hosmer,  Zenobia in Chains,  detail, carved marble, 1859

Harriet Hosmer, Zenobia in Chains, detail, carved marble, 1859

“Harriet Hosmer and the Feminine Sublime,” The Oxford Art Journal, v. 28, no. 1, Spring 2005, pp. 61-81.  

‘Harriet Hosmer and the Feminine Sublime’ argues that the mid-nineteenth century American sculptor Harriet Hosmer's sculptures contradict the Pygmalion ideal that guided the creation of much contemporaneous sculpture – namely, the wish to bring the inert block to life. Instead, in her portrait of historical heroines such as Zenobia (1859), Hosmer endeavoured to make the woman's body signify as the thick stone mass of marble from which it is carved.”

 

 
Francis Picabia,  Promenade des Anglais (Midi) , 1925-26, oil, enamel paint, feathers, pasta and leather on canvas, in a frame by Pierre Legrain,

Francis Picabia, Promenade des Anglais (Midi), 1925-26, oil, enamel paint, feathers, pasta and leather on canvas, in a frame by Pierre Legrain,